PHAFL Club Policies

PHAFL Club Policies2018-07-23T19:24:11+00:00

Pennant Hills AFL Club – Disability Action Plan

The Pennant Hills Australian Football Club recognizes that it is unlawful to treat a person with a disability less favourably than a person who does not have a disability, in the same or similar circumstances. Such discrimination is covered by the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity Act 1995.

Disability covers:
  • Physical
  • Intellectual
  • Psychiatric
  • Sensory
  • Neurological or learning difficulties
  • Presence in the body of organisms causing diseases
  • Beneficiaries of workers compensation

The Pennant Hills Australian Football Club embraces the Disability Discrimination Act
1992 premise that:

  • people with disabilities are part of our diverse communities
  • people with disabilities, their families and carers have a right to participate as fully as possible in the life of our communities
  • people with disabilities are the primary source of information regarding the physical, social and cultural barriers to their participation in their local community.

The Pennant Hills Australian Football Club will develop and implement a Disability Action Plan which will focus on those physical, social & cultural barriers which create a handicap for people with disabilities to be able to enjoy football at our Club.
Basic elements of the plan will include:

  1. Education of Club members
  2. Education of visitors to the Club
  3. Identifying specific issues at our Club that can make life unnecessarily difficult or complicated for people with disabilities
  4. Develop strategies to deal with these issues

Specific elements of the plan will include:

  1. Clearly defined disabled car parking areas at the football ground
  2. Disabled toilet facilities
  3. Access to canteen facilities
  4. Access to clubrooms
  5. Access to the football oval
  6. Exclusive accessible viewing areas

This action plan will be reviewed annually at the Annual General Meeting of the Football
Club to ensure the actions remain appropriate and effective.

 

AFL NSW ACT Code of Conduct

All players, officials and supporters are requested to familiarise themselves with the AFL NSW ACT Code of Conduct.

AFL NSW ACT Code of Conduct 2014 (click here to download as a PDF)

1.0 CODE OF CONDUCT
All players, officials and spectators are bound:
(A) To take all reasonable steps to prevent the game from being brought into disrepute.
(B) Not to engage in any Doping Practice as defined by the AFL’s Anti Doping Code (refer to AFL Anti Doping Code).
(C) Not to do anything which is likely to intimidate, offend, insult or humiliate another player on the ground of the religion, sexual orientation, disability, race, colour or national or ethnic origin of the person (refer to Vilification and Discrimination Policy).

2.0 PLAYERS CODE OF CONDUCT
A player must:
(A) Play by the rules – the rules of your Club and the laws of the game.
(B) Attend training sessions and matches at times advised by the Club. If unable, for a valid reason to do so, players will inform the Club as soon, as is practical.
(C) Act respectfully toward the officials and players of their own and opposing Clubs.
(D) Respect and follow the directions of coaching staff, match and club officials.
(E) Treat all players with respect, as you would want them to treat you.
(F) Act respectfully towards match officials at all times. Abusive language is unacceptable.
(G) Avoid individual or collective behaviour, which may reasonably be held by spectators to be offensive.
(H) Avoid all acts likely to incite spectators to violence or disorder.
(I) Make no detrimental statements in public (radio, television, print or electronic media) in respect to the performance of any match officials, players, or any policy decisions of the Club or the League. Abide by the By-Laws, (Rules & Regulations) and the Competition Rules of the League.
(J) Respect the facilities and equipment of their own and opposing Clubs.
(K) Do not use remarks based on race, religion, gender or ability as many such comments are politically incorrect and it is your coach, team-mates, Club and family that are let down with such remarks.
(L) Do not use information technology to make or post inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or the League which is discriminatory or offensive. Information technology includes, but is not limited to, email, instant messaging, text messages, phone messages, digital images, website postings (including social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs).

3.0 PARENTS & SUPPORTERS CODE OF CONDUCT
(A) Remember that you are there for the participants to enjoy the game.
(B) Encourage participation, but don’t force it.
(C) Teach that enjoyment is more important than winning.
(D) Never ridicule mistakes or losses Supporters are there to support not downgrade.
(E) Lead by example and respect all players, coaches, umpires, administrators and spectators. Physical or verbal abuse will not be tolerated.
(F) Recognise all volunteers who give up their valuable time.
(G) Never publicly criticise umpires, rather raise personal concerns with club officials in private
(H) Do not use remarks based on race, religion, gender or ability as many such comments are politically incorrect and it is your coach, team-mates, Club and family that are let down with such remarks.
(I) Respect the facilities and equipment of their own and opposing Clubs.
(J) Do not engage in physical and/or verbal intimidation, abuse or conduct toward any player, official, umpire or supporter. Such actions are totally unacceptable.
(K) Condemn the use of violence in any form, whether it is by spectators, coaches, officials or players.
(L) Abusive language is unacceptable.
(M) Do not use information technology to make or post inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or the League which is discriminatory or offensive. Information technology includes, but is not limited to, email, instant messaging, text messages, phone messages, digital images, website postings (including social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs).

4.0 COACHES CODE OF CONDUCT
(A) Set a good example and display utmost honesty and integrity in all dealings.
(B) Teach fair play and good sportsmanship
(C) Never place the value of winning above that of instilling the highest possible ideals and character.
(D) Be reasonable in demands, setting goals and expectations at an attainable level.
(E) Maintain a current knowledge of the rules of the game.
(F) Teach and interpret the laws of the game to the players.
(G) Never ridicule players.
(H) Respect the rights, dignity and worth of all individuals within the context of my involvement in Australian Football, including refraining from any discriminatory practices on the basis of race, religion, ethnic background, or special ability/disability.
(I) Encourage and create opportunities to develop individual as well as team skill.
(J) Ensure that all players understand the importance of regular attendance at training and positive attitude at training and that team selection throughout the season, including the finals, may be influenced by their training attendance and attitude.
(K) Ensure that injured players are given prompt and competent medical attention and that doctor’s orders are strictly adhered to.
(L) Endeavour to keep informed regarding sound principles of coaching and skill development and of factors relating to the welfare of my players.
(M) Display and teach appropriate sporting behaviour, ensuring that players understand and practice fair play.
(N) Display and foster respect for umpires, opponents, coaches, administrators, other officials, parents and spectators.
(O) Abide by the By-Laws, (Rules & Regulations) and the Competition Rules of the League.
(P) Do not engage in physical and/or verbal intimidation, abuse or conduct toward any player, official, umpire or supporter. Such actions are totally unacceptable.
(Q) Respect the facilities and equipment of their own and opposing Clubs.
(R) Make no detrimental statements in public (radio, television, print or electronic media) in respect to the performance of any match officials, players, or any policy decisions of the Club or to the League.
(S) Do not use information technology to make or post inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or the League which is discriminatory or offensive. Information technology includes, but is not limited to, email, instant messaging, text messages, phone messages, digital images, website postings (including social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs).

5.0 ADMINISTRATORS CODE OF CONDUCT
(A) Involve others in planning, leadership, evaluation and decision making related to Australian Football.
(B) Create pathways for people to participate and develop through the sport not just as players but also as coaches, umpires and administrators.
(C) Ensure equipment and facilities are safe and appropriate to the ability level of the participants.
(D) Establish that qualified and competent coaches and officials capable of developing appropriate sports behaviour and specific skill technique provide adequate supervision.
(E) Help coaches and officials highlight appropriate behaviour and skill development and help improve the standards of coaching and officiating.
(F) Assist all participants in Australian Football to know and understand the rules.
(G) Set a conduct example for others to follow.
(H) Make it clear that abusing people in any way is unacceptable and will result in disciplinary action.
(I) Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every person.
(J) Make no detrimental statements in public (radio, television, print or electronic media) in respect to the performance of any match officials, players, or any policy decisions of the Club or the League.
(K) Do not engage in physical and/or verbal intimidation, abuse or conduct toward any player, official, umpire or supporter. Such actions are totally unacceptable.
(L) Always respect the use of facilities and equipment provided.
(M) Ensure on and off the field behaviour is consistent with the principles of good sportsmanship.
(N) Ensure all parents, coaches, sponsors, administrators, officials, medical staff and players, understand their responsibilities regarding fair play in sport.
(O) Abide by the By-Laws, (Rules & Regulations) and the Competition Rules of the League.
(P) Do not use information technology to make or post inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or the League which is discriminatory or offensive. Information technology includes, but is not limited to, email, instant messaging, text messages, phone messages, digital images, website postings (including social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs).

6.0 OFFICIALS CODE OF CONDUCT
(A) Display fairness and uniformity in applying the rules.
(B) Be honest in your assessment of situations.
(C) Be consistent and courteous in calling all infractions.
(D) Condemn deliberate fouls as being unsporting and promote fair play and appropriate sports behaviour.
(E) The health and safety of the players must be the most important reason to be weighed in during the decision making process.
(F) Use common sense to ensure the ‘spirit of the game’ for players is not lost by being too pedantic when applying the rules.
(G) Be a positive role model in behaviour and personal appearance.
(H) Ensure you remain up to date with any rule changes and/or interpretation of rules as laid down by the AFL
(I) Seek continual self-improvement through study, performance appraisal and regular updating of competencies.
(J) Do not engage in physical and/or verbal intimidation, abuse or conduct toward any player, official, umpire or supporter. Such actions are totally unacceptable.
(K) Do not use information technology to make or post inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or the League which is discriminatory or offensive. Information technology includes, but is not limited to, email, instant messaging, text messages, phone messages, digital images, website postings (including social media such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs).

 

AFL NSW ACT Regulations & By Laws 2012

AFL NSW – ACT Regulations

 

 

AFL NSW ACT Statement of Electronic Communication

Electronic Communication is a vital part of running a grass roots football club. AFL NSW/ACT will not tolerate inappropriate use of electronic communication.

Electronic Communication

AFL NSW/ACT recognizes the growing reliance on information technology and the internet for communication within the Australian football community.

Electronic communication such as email, instant messaging, text message, phone messages, digital images, social (including Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, MySpace and blogs) are now all vital parts of the communications mix for community football leagues clubs and their constituents.

When used appropriately, these modes of communication offer effective and efficient ways to share information easily, often in fun and novel ways, which helps save time and effort for volunteers and administrators.

AFL NSW/ACT encourages the grass roots football community to optimize technology and use electronic forms of communication. AFL NSW/ACT itself uses many of these modes for daily communication and marketing to all stakeholders.

Inappropriate Use of Electronic Communication

Due to a number of factors, electronic communication can sometimes lead to antisocial, inappropriate, and illegal behaviour and activity. When such negative behavior or activity occurs within the context of a football community, the outcome can be devastating to a football league, club or individuals.

Inappropriate use of electronic communication within the football environment includes, but is not limited to, making or posting inappropriate comments against players, clubs, club officials, match officials or leagues which is hurtful, discriminatory or offensive in nature.

AFL NSW/ACT is concerned about the increasing number of incidents relating to the inappropriate use of electronic communication.

The AFL NSW/ACT Regulations and By-Laws and Codes of Conduct (for Players, Coaches, Administrators, Officials, and Parents & Supporters), stipulate that inappropriate use of electronic communication will not be tolerated and can be subject to disciplinary action by a League or Independent Tribunal.

Guidelines

Leagues, clubs or individuals who feel that they have been the victims of inappropriate electronic communication may report the matter in writing to their respective League Official/Administrator, along with any evidence (such as printouts) of the offending material.

The league shall then investigate the matter and, upon investigation, has the power to either deal with the matter itself or refer the matter to an Independent Tribunal or Conduct Committee.

Matters which are perceived to be more serious may be reported to police.

http://www.aflnswact.com.au 2012
AFL NSW ACT Vilification & Discrimination Policy

AFL     NSW/ACT VILIFICATION & DISCRIMINATION POLICY

(Name of League). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  (League) is committed to fostering and maintaining a sporting environment which promotes understanding, accepts the unique differences of all persons affiliated with or interested in Australian Football, and recognises the need to prohibit certain discriminatory or vilifying conduct. To this end,…………………………… has regard to the overarching AFL Vilification Policy, as well as other applicable AFL NSW/ACT Policies including the AFL Member Protection Policy, in setting forth this document which establishes the means of redress for players and officials aggrieved by what they reasonably consider to be vilification or discrimination based on their individuality.

1     Application & Scope of Policy

1.1.    The League is bound by applicable provisions of State-based legislation as well as the:
a)    Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth);
b)    Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth);
c)    Human Rights & Equal Opportunity Commission Act 1986 (Cth); and
d)    Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) (Legislation).
1.2.    This Policy is consistent with the Australian Football League’s Vilification Policy and is not in substitution of the Legislation.
1.3    The League will ensure that this Policy is communicated to Participants of the League.  It will, also use its best endeavours to ensure that Participants of the League receive vilification and discrimination training as well as promote a safe and inclusive match day environment.
1.4    Nothing in this Policy prevents a person lodging a Complaint in relation to vilification or discrimination under the Legislation. In the event a Complaint is made under this Policy the League shall ensure that the parties are informed of their rights and that best endeavours are made to maintain the confidentiality of the Complaints Process unless a properly constituted Tribunal directs otherwise.
1.5    This Policy applies to all Clubs that are affiliated with the League.

2     Definitions
In this Policy-

“Complaint” means an allegation, contention or assertion made by a Participant or Participants in relation to the conduct of another Participant or Participants which the first Participant or Participants claim is Prohibited Conduct. Complaints will be either an Intra-Club Complaint or an Inter-Club Complaint.

“Complaints Process” means the procedure outlined in sections 3 to 10 of this Policy.

“Conciliation” means a method of alternative dispute resolution to which a third party (the “conciliator”) attempts to facilitate an agreed resolution of the dispute through active input and advice to Participants about the best way to resolve the Complaint.

“Club” means any football Club that is an affiliate of the League.

“Club Complaints Officer” means a person appointed by the Club to oversee this Vilification & Discrimination Policy, the education of Participants, and to liaise with all persons relevant to the Complaints Process to the extent that it involves a Complaint made in respect of a Participant of the Club, and to act in accordance with section 5.2 and 5.3.

“Club Official” includes committee members, coaches, coaching staff, trainers, runners, persons involved in the every-day administration of the Club and any person who may reasonably be perceived to hold an official Club position.

“Engage in Conduct” is defined with reference to the ordinary meaning ascribed to the phrase but also expressly includes use of the internet, Social Media or email to publish or transmit statements or other material.

“League Complaints Officer/s” means either the League CEO, League President, League General Manager or such other person as thought fit and proper to hold the position, having regard to the obligations as set out in section 5 and in the Complaints Process.

“Informal Resolution” means an informal arrangement, understanding or agreement that, in the reasonable opinion of the League Complaints Officer/s or the Club Complaints Officer, has been reached in relation to either an Inter-Club Complaint or an Intra-Club Complaint between the Participant or Participants alleged to have engaged in the Prohibited Conduct and the Participant or Participants alleged to have been the subject of the Prohibited Conduct. Such informal arrangements or agreements may involve an oral apology or a retraction.

“Inter-Club Complaint” means a Complaint by a Participant or Participants from one Club involving an allegation of Prohibited Conduct directed at a Participant or Participants from a second Club.

“Intra-Club Complaint” means a Complaint by a Participant or Participants from one Club involving an allegation of Prohibited Conduct directed at a Participant or Participants from within the same Club.

“Investigation Officer” means an independent person selected by the League in accordance with section 8 of this Policy to investigate a complaint and to provide a recommendation to the League Complaints Officer/s.

“League” means the ………………….. (Name of League).

“Participate” means to engage in any activity or behaviour which is either directly or indirectly related or reasonably incidental to Australian Football as that term is understood under the Laws of Australian Football.

“Participant” includes a player, spectator, umpire, employee, volunteer to and agent of a Football Club that Participates in the League.

“Prohibited Conduct” means the conduct outlined in section 3 of this Policy.

“Social Media” has the meaning ascribed to it by AFL NSW/ACT, or otherwise refers to what may reasonably be perceived to involve communication involving novel digital formats and platforms including, but not limited to, Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, instant-messenger and derivations of email.
.
3     Prohibited Conduct

3.1    Vilification & Discrimination
No League Participant or Club Official shall engage in conduct which may reasonably be considered to incite hatred towards, contempt for, ridicule of or discrimination against a person or group of persons on the ground of their:
•    race;
•    religion;
•    gender;
•    colour;
•    sexual preference, orientation or identity; or
•    special ability or disability.

4    Appointment of League Complaints Officer/s & Club Complaints Officer

4.1    The League shall appoint a League Complaints Officer/s to ensure that any breach of this Policy is responded to in an equitable and prompt manner in accordance with this Policy.
4.2    The League shall ensure that all Clubs have a Club Complaints Officer to whom all vilification and discrimination Complaints are directed.
4.3    The League Complaints Officer/s is responsible for liaising between Club Complaints Officers, in the case of an Inter-Club Complaint, or with a single Club Complaints Officer, in the case of an Intra-Club Complaint, in an attempt to achieve Informal Resolution of the Complaint.

4.4    The Club Complaints Officer and the League Complaints Officer/s shall liaise directly over incidents which in the reasonable opinion of the Club Complaints Officer or League Complaints Officer/s are contrary to Section 3.

5     Preliminary Resolution Process

5.1    In the event that it is alleged that a person subject to section 3.1 has engaged in Prohibited Conduct, a Participant may by 5.00pm on the first working day following the day on which the Prohibited Conduct is alleged to have occurred, lodge a Complaint with the Club Complaints Officer.

5.2    In the case of an Inter-Club Complaint, the Club Complaints Officer where the Complaint was made shall by 5.00pm on the next working day following the day on which the Complaint was lodged with the Club, lodge the Complaint with the League’s Complaints Officer. The Club Complaints Officer shall take no further action once the Complaint has been lodged with the League unless otherwise instructed by the League’s Complaint’s Officer. In the case of an Inter-Club Complaint, the League Complaints Officer/s shall take reasonable steps within the next three (3) days following the day on which the Complaint was lodged with the League Complaint Officer/s to achieve an Informal Resolution if, in the reasonable opinion of the League Complaints Officer/s, the Complaint is capable of an Informal Resolution.
5.3    In the case of an Intra-Club Complaint, the Club Complaints Officer shall take reasonable steps within the next three (3) days following the day on which the Complaint was lodged with the Club to achieve an Informal Resolution if, in the reasonable opinion of the Club Complaints Officer, the Complaint is capable of an Informal Resolution. If an Informal Resolution is not achieved or it is reasonably believed that the Complaint is incapable of an Informal Resolution, the Club Complaints Officer shall as soon as is reasonably practicable lodge the Complaint with the League’s Complaints Officer. The Club Complaints Officer shall take no further action once the Complaint has been lodged with the League unless otherwise instructed by the League’s Complaint’s Officer.
5.4    In circumstances where in the reasonable opinion of the League Complaints Officer/s a Complaint cannot be resolved by way of Informal Resolution, the League Complaints Officer/s shall proceed to Conciliation in accordance with section 7 below.

6     Confidentiality and Records

6.1    Confidentiality must be maintained throughout the Complaints Process. All parties to a Complaint, the League’s Complaints Officer, the Club Complaints Officer, any witnesses and the conciliator must all agree to the maintenance of confidentiality. No person involved in the Complaints Process shall publicly comment on any aspect of the Complaints Process without the prior written agreement of all parties.

6.2    The League shall ensure that any documents relating to a Complaint shall remain confidential and be retained for 7 years from the date that the Complaint is made.

7     Conciliation Process

7.1    The League Complaints Officer/s shall make every effort to ensure that:

7.1(a)(i)    confidentiality is maintained at all times during the Complaints Process and that the outcome of the Complaints Process remains confidential;
7.1(a)(ii)    any breach of confidentiality is referred to the League Tribunal no later than 5pm on the next working day following the day that the breach is discovered, with the Tribunal to be convened within 7 days from the day on which the referral is made;
7.1(b)    the person alleged to have contravened the Policy is informed of the Complaint, the Complaint Process and provide that person with an opportunity to respond to the Complaint;
7.1(c)    the President or CEO of the League or his or her Nominee is informed that a Complaint has been received by the League Complaints Officer/s;
7.1(d)    statements are obtained from any witnesses identified by the parties to the Complaint;
7.1(e)    where available, obtain any other relevant evidence;
7.1(f)    any witness statements or any other evidence obtained in the course of conciliating a Complaint is made available to both parties, with an opportunity to comment, as part of the Conciliation process;
7.1(g)    a conciliator is appointed to conciliate the Complaint; and
7.1(h)    all steps necessary for the Complaint to be conciliated are taken within 10 working days from the day on which the Prohibited Conduct is alleged to have occurred.
7.2    Participants subject to Conciliation who are under 18 years of age must be accompanied at the Conciliation by a Club Official over 18 years of age.
8     Investigation
8.1    In circumstances where a Complaint is not resolved in accordance with section 7 above, the League Complaints Officer/s may refer the matter to an Investigation Officer to investigate aspects of the allegation or circumstances surrounding the Complaint which, in the reasonable opinion of the League Complaints Officer/s, require further investigation to resolve the Complaint.
8.2    The Investigation Officer shall report to the League Complaints Officer/s on any information or evidence obtained in accordance with 8.1. Any information or evidence obtained by the Investigation Officer and provided to the League Complaints Officer/s shall be provided to all parties to the Complaint as part of the Complaint Process.
9     Tribunal Referrals, Process & Appeal
9.1    Following an investigation under section 8, if any, or following a failed Conciliation under section 7, the League Complaints Officer/s may refer the Complaint to a League Tribunal for determination. The League Complaints Officer/s shall take all steps necessary to make a decision about the referral of the Complaint to the League Tribunal as soon as is reasonably practicable.
9.2    The League Tribunal will be constituted in accordance with the rules and regulations of the League and the League shall determine who is responsible for prosecuting the Complaint at the Tribunal.
9.3    Where the referral to the League Tribunal is made pursuant to this section 9.1 of this Policy, the Tribunal will hear the Complaint within 5 working days of the Complaint referral being made.
9.4    The League Tribunal has the power to order any reasonable penalties or directions for breaches of this Policy as are allowable under the rules and regulations of the League in force at the time of the hearing.
9.5    Where a party to a Complaint is unsatisfied with the decision made by the League Tribunal, they may ask the Club’s Officer to request that the League establish a panel to hear an appeal from the decision in accordance with the League’s appeal regulations.
10     Club Liability
10.1    If found to have contravened this Policy a Club may be vicariously liable for Prohibited Conduct engaged in by a Participant connected to the Club if the Club is unable to establish that it took reasonable precautions to prevent the Participant from engaging in that Prohibited Conduct.
11     Monitoring and Review of the Policy
11.1    The Policy will be monitored on an ongoing basis by the League’s Committee.
12     Policy Commencement
12.1    This Policy will take effect as of 9 November 2012.

AFL NSWACT Vilification Policy Final

 

 

AFL personal injury 2013

In light of two tragic football-related accidents this year I want to strongly urge all community football
clubs to review their level of player insurance cover under the National Insurance Program. At present
most clubs select only the base level of cover available.

While steps have recently been taken to increase the base level of paraplegía and quadriplegia cover from a $100,000 to a $250,000 payout,
clubs still have the option to upgrade to a maximum level of insurance cover ($1 million) to ensure
players can receive more adequate financial assistance in the event of a life-long debilitating injury.As a Club volunteer responsible for insurance, l encourage you to take out the maximum level of cover
available under the National Insurance Program to ensure your players are adequately protected in
the event of a terrible accident. The extra cost in premiums is a small price to pay in the context of the
peace of mind such coverage brings.The rules of football are designed to minimise the risk of injury to participants as far as is possible for a
physical Contact sport. However, serious accidents unfortunately can still happen. It is likely you are
already aware of two brave young footballers this year – Beau Vernon and Trent Rothall – who were
each involved in on-field accidents which resulted in quadriplegia. These young men now face the
traumatic reality they may spend the rest of their lives in a wheel chair. This medical diagnosis has
obviously been devastating for them and also their families, friends and the entire football community
– although I note that both Beau and Trent are showing great courage in the extensive rehabilitation
they are undertaking in an attempt to improve their condition.The treatment and rehabilitation costs for both young men are obviously high and will be long term.
Their families, local communities and many in the football world have rallied around to help raise
much-needed funds and to help out in other ways. The reality is that we cannot prevent tragic
accidents, but we can make sure our players are adequately protected should something go wrong on
the field or at training. For this reason, the AFL, led by our Commission and supported by the Vernon
and Rothall Families, urges you to review your insurance cover with a view to taking out the highest
level of protection available. For the sake of your players and their families, please take the time to
examine the options available.We also recommend you consult every player at your Club on the options they have available to
protect their incomeI and advise them to consider purchasing private health insurance, and have
ambulance cover as a minimum. Hopefully they will never need to use itI but it is surely better to be
safe than sorry. lt is worth noting that the National Insurance Program should not be seen as an
alternative or replacement for personal life insurance or private health insurance. It is designed to
provide players with an adequate and affordable insurance solution. Every player is encouraged to
consider their individual circumstances prior to taking the field.Pleased review your Ciub’s current level of insurance protection and visit the JLT Sport Website:
httQ:Hafl.`|Itsgortcom.auluggradeasgxThanks for taking the time to read this important notice and good luck to your Club for the 2013
season.JLT Sport is a division of Jardine Lloyd Thompson Pty Limited ABN 69 009 864 AFS Licence 226827

Cover is subject to the Trustees discretion andfor the relevant policy terms, conditions and
exclusions. Any advice En this document is general advice and does not take into account your
objectives, financial situation or needs. You should consider the relevant Product Disclosure
Statement and your objectives, financial situation or needs before acting on this advice. Please visit

http:I!www.j|ta.com.au!jcItIafl or oontaotJLT Sport on 1300 130 373 for the relevant Product
Disclosure Statement, or for further information.

AFL Player & Official Deregistration Policy Current as at: May 2011
The Deregistration Policy has been developed to provide a risk management framework and policy basis for community football administrators to recognise a duty of care with respect to players/officials who could pose an unacceptable risk to other players/officials.
It is imperative that all Leagues and State Bodies adopt this policy to ensure that a consistent approach is applied to the deregistration of players/officials.
AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL PLAYER AND OFFICIAL NATIONAL DEREGISTRATION POLICY

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

The Deregistration Policy has been developed to provide a risk management framework and policy basis for community football administrators to recognise a duty of care with respect to players/officials who could pose an unacceptable risk to other players/officials.
It is imperative that all Leagues and State Bodies adopt this policy to ensure that a consistent approach is applied to the deregistration of players/officials.

1.2 Definitions

Club means an Australian football club entitled to field a team in a competition conducted by a League.

Deregistration means the withdrawal of a Player’s permit to play or an Official’s capacity to officiate in any form of Australian football. League means a league associated with a State Body via an affiliation agreement.

Reportable Offence means any reportable offence identified in the Laws of Australian Football, as amended from time to time.

Official includes but not limited to coaches, assistant coaches, officers, trainers, runners, employees or any person performing any duties (paid or unpaid) for or on behalf of a Club, League or State Body.

Player means a player who participates in any Australian football match administered by a League.

State Body means the governing State and Territory football bodies affiliated to the AFL as follows:
(a) AFL NSW/ACT
(b) AFL Queensland
(c) AFL Northern Territory
(d) AFL Tasmania
(e) AFL Victoria
(f) South Australian National Football League
(g) West Australian Football Commission

Suspension means a period during which a Player or Official is not allowed to play or officiate in a game of Australian football.

1.3 Application

(a) The Deregistration Policy applies to all State Bodies and their affiliated Leagues and Clubs.
(b) Headings and indexes are only included for ease of reference and do not affect interpretation.

1.4 Variation

The AFL may from time to time, and in consultation with State Bodies where necessary, alter the procedures for Deregistration in its absolute discretion.

2. POLICY AIMS

The policy aims to:
(a) Deregister a Player who is found guilty of a Reportable Offence(s) where such offence or offences cause the tribunal history of such Player to fall beyond an acceptable level for Australian football;
(b) Deregister an Official who is found guilty of a Reportable Offence(s) (at any level) where such offence or offences are deemed to fall beyond an acceptable level for Australian football;
(c) Apply the Deregistration of a Player/Official to both roles so that a deregistered Player cannot officiate in any capacity and a deregistered Official cannot participate as a Player;
(d) Prevent a Player from transferring between Leagues with the view to creating a “clean slate” with the new League. The tribunal history shall follow the Player to allow the new League to make an informed judgement regarding initial registration taking into account past and current tribunal sentences.

3. DEREGISTRATION PROCEDURES

3.1 General

(a) The full tribunal history of a Player is to be forwarded to the new League from the previous League upon a Player being cleared from one League to another (as per the National Player Transfer Regulations, as amended from time to time). It is noted that all guilty verdicts determined by a League (tribunal, investigation, appeal or similar process) shall be forwarded to the new League for their records together with the clearance / transfer details.
(b) The full tribunal history of a Player (including tribunal record at all previous league/s) shall be considered when determining penalties for offences and also potential Deregistration.
(c) A League that suspects that an Official may have a tribunal history is to seek information from the Official’s previous League/s.
(d) Club imposed penalties will not be considered on the permanent record for a Player or Official.
(e) Information regarding suspended sentences will be transferred between Leagues and Leagues would only consider such sentences relevant to possible Deregistration if and when the Suspension from such suspended sentence is served.

3.2 Deregistration Process

3.2.1 Notification

(a) Leagues
i) State Leagues must advise all Clubs of the details of the policy and make the policy readily available to their Clubs, Players and Officials.
ii) Once a Player/Official has accumulated a Suspension history of ten (10) weeks or more, the League must advise the Player/Official and their Club in writing that the Player/Official faces the risk of automatic Deregistration should the Player/Official incur further Suspension(s) that results in him/her reaching or exceeding the sixteen (16) week total Suspension history.
iii) Notification of Deregistration shall be made in writing to the Player/Official and their Club.
iv) State Bodies shall be notified in writing of all decisions to deregister a Player/Official, by the Player’s/Official’s Club. A central database of all deregistered players/officials will be kept by all State Bodies.
v) Should a Player/Official’s tribunal history already have reached or exceed a combined total of sixteen (16) weeks Suspension at the time of implementing this policy, the League is to formally advise the Player/Official and the Player’s/Official’s club that the Player/Official faces automatic Deregistration should the Player/Official incur another Suspension.
(b) Clubs
i) Clubs must advise all of their Players/Officials in relation to this policy.
ii) Clubs must at all times strive to ensure their Players and Officials do not get themselves into a position of potentially being deregistered. Anger management training is seen as a critical component of this prevention for Clubs to arrange.

3.2.2 Criteria for Deregistration

(a) Players
i) Players shall be automatically deregistered and not allowed further registration with the same or another League if the Player has accumulated a combined total of sixteen (16) weeks Suspension (or greater) in a football career (including AFL career, subject to section 3.2.2(a)(iii) below).
ii) For the avoidance of doubt, only Suspension periods served by a Player after attaining the age of 16 years will count for the purposes of this Deregistration policy.
iii) Any Suspension period served by a Player during his AFL career shall carry over, however such Suspension period shall be halved for the purposes of this Deregistration policy. For example, if a Player receives a total of six (6) weeks Suspension whilst playing in the AFL, only three (3) weeks shall carry over for the purposes of this Deregistration policy.
First Offence
iv) Should a Player receive sixteen (16) weeks or more Suspension as a “first offence” it shall be at the Leagues discretion as to whether or not that Player will be deregistered, following his/her Suspension.
(b) Officials Officials shall be deregistered and not allowed to officiate in any form in the same or another League if they have accumulated a combined total of sixteen (16) weeks Suspension (or greater) throughout their whole Australian football career.
(c) Players / Officials A combined total of sixteen (16) weeks or greater as a Player and/or Official shall result in automatic Deregistration.

3.3 Deregistered Players/Officials Seeking Re-registration

(a) A Player/Official shall not be eligible for re-registration unless the Player or Official gains an exemption to reregister from the relevant State Body. Such exemption shall only be granted under exceptional circumstances (i.e. where the relevant State Body is satisfied that the Player/Official is genuinely rehabilitated and unlikely to re-offend).
(b) A deregistered Player cannot officiate in or at any Australian football match unless an exemption is given by the relevant State Body.
(c) A deregistered Official cannot participate as a Player or officiate in or at any Australian football match.
(d) A deregistered Player/Official who is successful in gaining an exemption to play/officiate and subsequently re-offends will automatically be deregistered with no further right to apply for an exemption or to appeal.

3.4 Appeals

After a Player/Official has been deregistered in accordance with section 3.2 above, that Player/Official may appeal to their State body in accordance with the rules set out in section 3.5 below.

3.5 Appeals to State Body

(a) A deregistered Player/Official can appeal a decision of their State Body in accordance with their State Body’s rules, regulations, by-laws and/or guidelines regulating tribunal and appeals procedures, as amended from time to time.
(b) It is the obligation of the Player/Official to present their case with all necessary witnesses and relevant documents to the State Body and show cause why he/she should be reregistered.
(c) A Player/Official may only submit one (1) appeal in any one Australian football season.
(d) Such appeal shall be heard within a period determined by the State Body.
(e) Notwithstanding any provision within a State Body’s rules, regulations, by-laws and/or guidelines, the State Body reserves the right, in its absolute discretion, to impose any time limits relating to appeals as it deems appropriate.
(f) The decision of the State Body shall be final and binding on all parties.

AFL May 2011
AFL Role of Helmets & Mouthguards

This document has been published by the AFL as a position statement on the role of helmets and mouthguards in Australian Football. It is based on advice provided by the AFL Concussion Working Group and AFL Medical Officers’ Association. – July, 2012 

Helmets 

  • There is no definitive scientific evidence that helmets prevent concussion or other brain injuries in Australian football.
  • There is some evidence that younger players who wear a helmet may change their playing style, and receive more head impacts as a result. Accordingly, helmets are not recommended for the prevention of concussion.
  • Helmets may have a role in the protection of players on return to play following specific injuries (e.g. face or skull fractures).

Mouthguards

  • Mouthguards have a definite role in preventing injuries to the teeth and face and for this reason they are strongly recommended at all levels of football.
  • Dentally fitted laminated mouthguards offer the best protection. ‘Boil and bite’ type mouthguards are not recommended for any level of play as they can dislodge during play and block the airway.
  • There is no definitive scientific evidence that mouthguards prevent concussion or other brain injuries in Australian Football.

References

  1. McCrory P, Meeuwisse W, Johnston K, Dvorak J, Aubry M, Molloy M, et al. Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport: the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Zurich, November 2008. Br J Sports Med. 2009 May;43 Suppl 1:i76-90.
  2. Makdissi M, McCrory P, Ugoni A, Darby D, Brukner P. A prospective study of postconcussive outcomes after return to play in Australian football. Am J Sports Med. 2009 May;37(5):877-83.
  3. Iverson GL, Gaetz M, Lovell MR, Collins MW. Cumulative effects of concussion in amateur athletes. Brain Inj.2004 May;18(5):433-43.
  4. McKee AC, Cantu RC, Nowinski CJ, Hedley-Whyte ET, Gavett BE, Budson AE, et al. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in athletes: progressive tauopathy after repetitive head injury. Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology. [Case Reports Review]. 2009 Jul;68(7):709-35.
    1.  Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    2. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t
    3. Research Support, U.S. Gov’t, Non-P.H.S.
  5. Jordan BD, Relkin NR, Ravdin LD, Jacobs AR, Bennett A, Gandy S. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 associated with chronic traumatic brain injury in boxing. Jama. 1997 Jul 9;278(2):136-40.
  6. Benson BW, Hamilton GM, Meeuwisse WH, McCrory P, Dvorak J. Is protective equipment useful in preventing concussion? A systematic review of the literature. Br J Sports Med. 2009 May;43 Suppl 1:i56-67.
  7. Hagel B, Meeuwisse W. Risk compensation: a “side effect” of sport injury prevention? Clin J Sport Med. 2004Jul;14(4):193-6.
  8. Heintz W. The case for mandatory mouth protectors. Phys Sportsmed. 1975;3:61-3.

AFL_Helmets_Mouthguards_Position_Statement

 

 

Responsible Approach to Concussion in the AFL

This document is divided into the following sections:

1. Background
2. AFL concussion personnel
3. Changes to protect against head & neck injury
4. Summary of concussion management guidelines
5. Research & projects underway
6. Further resources
1. BACKGROUND

Concussion is an issue which the AFL has always taken very seriously, and for that reason we have been at the forefront of global efforts in sport to better understand and address the issue in the interests of past and present players’ health and welfare. The AFL, in conjunction with medical experts in the field, has been active for approximately 25 years in monitoring and researching concussion in our game, including more intensively since the AFL Research Board was founded in 1999.

In addition, more recently significant steps have been taken to modify the rules of the game to better protect the head and neck of players, and more conservative guidelines have been introduced for the management of potential concussion cases both at AFL and community level.

Concussion has received recent media attention both in Australia and overseas following developments in the US where the NFL has been under scrutiny regarding the possible long term effects on players of repeated hits to the head. The concerns relate to a possible increased likelihood of the development of depression, dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment later in life, as a result of impacts to the head during games or practice, and not just those hits resulting in concussion.

Significantly, Australian Football is played in a markedly different manner from the other football codes, including the NFL, however our game is a contact sport where concussion is a relatively common injury (6-7 concussions per team per season). For this reason we are committed to enhancing our understanding of concussion and to further improving our current approach to concussion management, including by building on our extensive body of research, especially on the subject of potential longer term effects.

Some relevant background on concussion in the AFL is as follows:
• Concussion rates have been relatively steady for over a decade in the AFL
• Current rates of concussion are approximately 6-7 per AFL team per season (including 1 concussion per team per season to miss a match)
• Research has been ongoing since 1985 and more intensively since 2007 following Dr. Michael Makdissi’s AFL-funded project on post-concussive outcomes after return to play in Australian Football and the 2008 Concussion Consensus Meeting in Zurich where AFL was represented and revised guidelines were developed and introduced (McCrory, Makdissi & Davis)
• Continuous injury surveillance has been conducted since the mid-1990s (Prof Paul McCrory throughout 1990’s and Dr Makdissi, University of Melbourne throughout 2000’s)
• Previous research on cognitive function of players (Dr David Maddocks, 1985-95) provides a unique longitudinal picture of the possible longer term effects of concussion
• AFL was featured in an American Journal of Sports Medicine for a leading approach to concussion management in 2008, and the Makdissi research was highlighted
• Revised guidelines were introduced for AFL and community level at the start of 2011 to encourage a more conservative management approach (based on expert opinion at the time)
• History of head injury and concussion incidence is included in Talent Pathway Medical Screening
• State Government funding and support has led to Victoria being an International centre of excellence for research into neuroscience and neurotrauma
2. AFL CONCUSSION PERSONNEL

The AFL established a concussion working group in 2010 to assist the AFL Research Board in steering the current suite of concussion projects, and identifying which further steps were necessary to ensure we are doing all that we can to consolidate the current best practice approach.

These personnel include the following (bios available on request):
• Dr Peter Harcourt, Dr Harry Unglik, Dr Anik Shawdon – AFL Administration
• Dr Hugh Seward – AFL Medical Officers Association
• Prof Paul McCrory – Chair of International Concussion in Sport Consensus Group and has organised the major international concussion consensus meetings Vienna 2001, Prague 2004, Zurich 2008 and Zurich 2012; Editor British Journal Sports Medicine; Associate Editor Clinical Journal Sports Medicine; 400+ scholarly works; Current appointments with University of Melbourne, Melbourne Brain Centre and Florey Neurosciences Institute
• Dr Michael Makdissi – AIS/AFL Academy Medical Officer; NHMRC Research Fellow with Melbourne Brain Centre; Panel member of the International Symposium on Concussion in Sport; British Journal of Sports Medicine; Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine and member IRB PitchSide Concussion Working Group
• Assoc Prof Gavin Davis – Senior Neurosurgeon at the Austin, Box Hill and Cabrini Hospitals with appointments at University of Notre Dame and University of Melbourne; Member of international panel of experts for development of concussion in sport guidelines (Zurich 2008); Co-author AFL Management of Concussion Guidelines 2011
• Dr David Maddocks – Neuropsychologist and Concussion researcher who’s pioneering research on AFL footballers in 1989 developed the concussion assessment questions still used by international sport today (“Maddocks questions”)
• All initiatives are well supported by experienced AFL Club Medical Staff
• All research coordinated by AFL Research Board (Chair – Dr Ross Smith)

We are fortunate to have individuals of this calibre involved with our work in this area, who have dealt specifically with the issue of concussion for a number of years. Concussion is a specialist area of neuroscience, dealing with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).
3. CHANGES TO PROTECT AGAINST HEAD & NECK INJURY

Player welfare is a key focus of the Laws of the Game process, especially with regard to head and neck injury. This has been facilitated by a strong relationship with AFL Club Medical and Conditioning staff, AFL Players Association and AFL Coaches Association, who work collaboratively with the AFL in the interests of player welfare.

Recent Laws and Tribunal changes to protect the head and neck include the following:
• New definition of charging (2000)
• Emphasis on protecting player on ground from being contacted from front on (2003)
• Bumping/making forceful contact from front on/bumping player with head over the ball (2007)
• Stricter policing of dangerous tackles (2007)
• High contact classification given to incidents where head hits the ground (2009)
• Rough conduct [head-high bump] (2009, 2010 & 2011)
• New guideline under rough conduct for dangerous tackles (2010)
• Interchange substitute rule (2011)
• Clarity on negligent and reckless dangerous tackles including sling tackles (2012)
• Increased penalty for striking incidents behind play (2012)

In addition, the AFL was one of the first professional sports to introduce a rule which prohibits clubs from playing a medically unfit player, whereby the club doctor is the only club person with the authority to make that decision. Sanctions of up to $50,000 apply for each individual breach within this rule.

4. SUMMARY OF CONCUSSION MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

Revised concussion management guidelines were introduced at the beginning of the 201 Season which require a more conservative approach to the management of concussion and return to play decisions. Along with setting a positive example at AFL level, these guidelines have also had a significant positive impact at community level.

The AFL guidelines prior to this were in line with the most recent Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport, and whilst there was no scientific basis for the AFL to make these guidelines more conservative, on the basis of taking a proactive approach to player welfare issues, and on expert advice, we felt it was prudent in the circumstances. It is often difficult for people watching a game to comprehend that a player exhibiting transient symptoms might not be concussed, and even a player with concussion can recover very quickly.

Several other sports including the NRL have since introduced revised guidelines which promote a similar more conservative approach.

AFL Level guidelines:
• Player diagnosed with concussion cannot take any further part in the game
• Players with transient symptoms are assessed to determine if they are due to concussion (e.g. blurred vision, dizziness, unsteadiness)
• If brain function is normal they may be allowed to continue playing, with ongoing monitoring for signs of concussion
• Post-concussion management in week following injury through:
– A period of rest to allow recovery
– Monitoring for recovery of symptoms and signs
– Use of cognitive tests to estimate recovery of brain function
– Graduated return to activity with monitoring for recurrence of symptoms
– Final medical clearance before resuming full contact training and/or playing
• All players to undergo computerised baseline tests during pre-season and following injury

Community level guidelines:
• Any player with suspected concussion must be withdrawn from playing or training immediately
• All players suspected of concussion need urgent medical assessment
• In days or weeks following concussion, player should not be allowed to return to play or train until they have had formal medical clearance
• At community level, the minimum requirement for injury support at Auskick/junior level is to have someone present with first aid qualifications. The minimum requirement at youth and senior level is to have someone present with AFL Emergency Response Coordinator training. It is recommended at all levels that clubs have accredited trainers present, and this is the case at many clubs, with several using physiotherapists and doctors along with their sports trainers
• All Senior, Youth & Junior coaching accreditation programs involve a module on injury prevention and management in which concussion is covered as a key area of responsibility, including the steps to be taken when a player is suspected of having concussion

Under both policies, if a player is unconscious and taken from the field on a stretcher they are unable to take any further part in the match.

5. RESEARCH & PROJECTS UNDERWAY

There are a range of projects underway to build our knowledge, increase awareness and further enhance our concussion management strategies.

The AFL’s overarching research questions are as follows:
a) What is the optimal approach to the detection and management of concussion?
b) What are the long term health ramifications of concussion?
c) What is the risk to player health and welfare in the AFL?

The full suite of current and pending projects can be categorised as follows:

Build Knowledge:
• Evaluation of impact of guidelines at community Level (Finch)
• Detailed review of all head injuries during 2011/12 seasons (Makdissi/Davis/AFLMOA)
• E-survey of current and past player health issues (AFLPA/McCrory)
• AFL Injury Report (Orchard/Seward)
• Monitoring the cognitive function of past players – follow-up to 1989 study (Maddocks)
• AFL Medical Director attendance at next Concussion Consensus Meeting in October 2012 in Zurich where the current guidelines will be reviewed (AFL)
• Comparison of health & wellness indicators in AFL players with general population (AFL)

Increase Awareness/Education:
• Updated Community Management guidelines (AFL)
• Development of joint AFL-AFLMOA position statement on helmets & mouthguards (AFLMOA)
• Update of relevant sections of AFL and Community website to provide detailed information on AFL rule changes, research projects, and health & wellness programs and policies (AFL)
• Inclusion of concussion awareness module as part of coach accreditation (AFL)
• Pre-season education workshops conducted by club doctors with AFL playing groups (AFLMOA)
• Laws of the game briefings with AFL club match committees and player leadership groups (AFL)
• Government briefings (Federal, State & Local)
• Face-to-face education of parents and community level players about symptoms of concussion to be potentially incorporated into current suite of broader community education sessions (AFL)
• Development of player and parent concussion information sheets (AFL)

Enhance Concussion Management:
• Roll-out of AFL concussion guidelines to other community level sports (Finch/Monash)
• Development of on-line player and parent/medical officer concussion education module (AFL)
• Review of clinical application of guidelines at community level in 2012 including use of video analysis and computerised assessment (AFLMOA)
• Computerised baseline testing for players when drafted and every pre-season to detect changes and abnormalities in cognitive function and assist with return to play decisions following injury (AFLMOA)
• Further establishment of support protocols for past or current players who have had head injuries during their career (McCrory/AFLPA)
• Further improvements to talent pathway screening programs (AFL)
• Update of revised AFL and Community level concussion guidelines following Concussion (AFL) Consensus Meeting in Zurich later this year (AFLMOA)

Potential AFL-Florey Neurosciences Institute concussion collaborate partnership
Discussions are at an advanced stage regarding a proposed partnership with the Florey Neurosciences Institute (FNI), one of the World’s leading brain research centres based in Melbourne. The partnership would be used to leverage significant third party funding for advanced longer term concussion research including use of advanced functional MRI imaging technology.

6. FURTHER RESOURCES

The following concussion resources are provided as attachments:
1. Management of Concussion in Australian Football (brochure outlining community level concussion management guidelines)
2. Concussion Recognition & Management Guidelines for players
3. Concussion Recognition & Management Guidelines for parents
4. Sports Trainers in Community Australian Football Policy

Further information and hard copies of the concussion management brochure, posters, and pocket SCAT2 card are available for dissemination by contacting shane.mccurry@afl.com.au.

http://www.aflcommunityclub.com.au May 2012
Sports Trainers in Community AFL Policy
The Management of Injuries & Medical Emergencies in Community Australian Football
Introduction

The AFL expects that football matches at all levels will be played in good quality environments and the safety of participants is central to that environment. As part of a risk management approach to the prevention of, and prompt attention to injuries in Australian Football, it is important that adequate and timely first aid is provided. In ideal situations one or more qualified trainers will be in attendance, generally attached to each team to provide the best possible support to participants.

Sports trainers and first aiders have been part of Australian Football since the origins of the game. They are part of the fabric of every club and play a key role in player preparation and safety at all levels.

In community Australian Football clubs, first aid is usually provided by sports trainers or by other volunteers with medical or higher level allied health (e.g. nursing, physiotherapy, occupational health & safety) qualifications and experience. Sports trainers are likely to play a more major role when there is no-one else with medical or allied health qualifications at a game or training. It is important that sports trainers, and others, are well trained in the first aid needs specifically relevant to Australian Football at the level at which they are involved (e.g. Auskick, juniors, youth, seniors, females, talent pathway, AFL clubs, veterans etc).

In previously published recommendations the AFL has stated that:
– A qualified first aider is present where participants are under 16 years
– A qualified sports trainer is present where participants are 16 years and older.

Research Project

In 2009/10 the AFL, through its Research Board, engaged Ballarat University to conduct a significant research project, reviewing the roles, competencies and training of providers of first aid and trainer services for Australian Football. This policy focusing on the management of injuries and medical emergencies in community Australian Football has been developed as part of that research. As a result more comprehensive requirements will apply in community football and will be introduced from 2011.

The Australian Football League (AFL) believes that planning and practising what to do when an emergency occurs is an essential part of risk management. All football leagues and clubs must be conversant with first aid procedures and able to deal with emergencies so participants are well cared for. All leagues and clubs should ensure that:

  • A person with current first aid qualifications is available at all football games and training sessions.
  • An appropriately and adequately stocked first aid kit and well maintained sport-specific rescue/transport equipment are accessible at all training and competition venues.

A sports trainer or first aid provider involved with a football club or team should have a clear understanding of the role and importance of injury prevention and immediate injury management in football. They should be aware of their responsibilities in relation to first aid equipment and facilities, and their obligations in relation to duty of care and record keeping.

Minimum Requirements

Qualified Sports trainers (as recognised by the AFL*) meet or exceed the minimum requirements of this policy.

At a minimum, at least one person competent in emergency management procedures and responses must be in attendance at all matches/competitions and, where practical, training/practice sessions. This person must be competent in:
1. Emergency planning—including ensuring access to a telephone, venue access for emergency vehicles and access to appropriate and adequate first aid equipment and supplies.
2. On-field assessment of injured participants—including the STOP (Stop, Talk, Observe, Prevent) and TOTAPS (Talk, Observe, Touch, Active movement, Passive movement & Skills test – some of which will be completed off field). This includes the immediate management of severe injuries and life threatening medical emergencies including spinal & neck injuries; concussion & intracranial (brain) injuries; unconscious casualties; airway/respiratory distress such as choking, airway obstructions & asthma.
3. On-field communication—including signals, team work and liaising with the umpire and others in official capacities.
4. Understanding emergency response priorities and applying emergency procedures —including the (DRSABCD) Danger, Response, Send for help, Airways, Breathing, and CPR and Defibrillation procedure.
5. Calling an ambulance
6. Transporting injured participants—including lifts, carries and use of an appropriate stretcher (pole and scoop).

Key Policy directives:

Matches

There must be at least one person with the above competencies in attendance at a match/competition, otherwise the activity should be postponed, rescheduled or cancelled until such time as a suitably competent person is able to attend.

  •  This policy must be complied with at youth and senior matches. The AFL Emergency Response Coordinator role and training (see next section for definition) – meets the minimum standards.
  • At AFL Auskick Centres and junior matches (up to Under 12), generally a person with a current, nationally accredited first aid certificate* will be acceptable if someone with a higher level trainer accreditation/qualification is not available. *Must include assessed competencies HLTFA301B (Apply First Aid) or HLTFA201 (Provide Emergency Life Support)

– Training

  • It is recommended that there is at least one person with the above competencies in attendance at all training/practice sessions. In any case the club, generally through the coach, will be responsible for providing a safe training environment if there is no other person with those competencies present at training. Some coaches may have the required competencies through their own personal or professional training.

– General

  • Generally, it is highly recommended that at least one person with an AFL recognised sports trainer or first aid qualification is in attendance at all training/practice sessions and matches/competitions.

In the longer term, the AFL vision is to have as many people with higher level trainer qualifications serving the game as possible. The AFL is committed to supporting leagues, clubs and teams in their efforts to meet the requirements of this policy. The AFL will therefore work towards ensuring that geographically and financially accessible football-related first aid and sports trainer training courses are available to anyone wishing to attend.

AFL Requirements for matches and training

LevelSenior 18+ Youth 13-17 Auskick/Junior 5-12
 MatchRecommended:Trainer Trainer Trainer
 Minimum: ERC ERC Current First Aid
 Training* Ideal: Trainer Trainer Trainer
 Recommended: ERC ERC Current First Aid

ERC: Emergency Response Coordinator
* Note: Overall responsibility of clubs to provide safe training environment

Pennant Hills AFL Club – Racial and Religious Policy
THE PENNANT HILLS AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL CLUB RACIAL AND RELIGIOUS TOLERANCE POLICY

Section 1 Commitment

1.1 The Pennant Hills Australian Football Club is committed to an environment which promotes racial and religious tolerance by prohibiting certain conduct and providing a means of redress for victims of racial and religious vilification and/or racial discrimination.
1.2 The Club is bound by the Anti Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW), the Discrimination Act

1991 (ACT) and the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth). This Policy is consistent with the legislation and the Australian Football League’s Rule 30. This Policy is not in substitution of the legislation.

1.3 The Club will ensure that this Policy is communicated to spectators and participants of the Club. It will also ensure that participants of the Club receive anti-racial and religious vilification and racial discrimination training on an annual basis.
1.4 Nothing in this Policy prevents a person lodging a complaint in relation to racial and religious vilification and/or racial discrimination under the legislation.

Section 2 Definitions

In this Policy-
complaints process” means the procedure outlined in sections 6, 7 and 8 of this
Policy.

Club” means the Pennant Hills Australian Football Club.

engage in conduct” includes use of the internet or e-mail to publish or transmit statements or other material.

League” means the Sydney Football League. “detriment” includes humiliation and denigration.

discrimination” means for the purpose of this Policy, conduct based on a person’s race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin. Discrimination may be direct or indirect. Direct discrimination means treating or proposing to treat another person less favourably on the basis of a person’s race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin. Indirect discrimination means imposing or intending to impose a requirement that a person of a particular race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin cannot comply with, but which a higher proportion of people without that attribute (or with a different attribute) can, when it is not reasonable in the circumstances to do so.

“participant” includes a player, director, officer, employee, volunteer to and agent of a Football Club that participates in the League.

spectator” is a person that attends a football game or event conducted by a Club or the League.

Section 3 Prohibited Conduct

3.1 Racial and Religious Vilification

No person in his/her capacity as a spectator or participant in the League in the course of carrying out his/her duties or functions as or incidental to being a participant in the League shall engage in conduct that offends, humiliates, intimidates, contempt’s, ridicules, incites, (consider adding a comment specifying what needs to be incited?) threatens, disparages, vilifies or insults another person on the basis of that person’s
race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin.

3.2 Serious Racial and Religious Vilification

No person in his/her capacity as a spectator or participant in the Club in the course of carrying out his/her duties of functions as or incidental to being a participant in the Club shall intentionally engage in conduct that he/she knows is likely to incite hatred against
another person, or threaten physical harm or incite hatred in others to cause physical
harm to a person or to a person’s property because of that person’s race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin.

3.3 Racial and Religious Discrimination

No person in his/her capacity as a spectator or participant in the Club in the course of carrying out his/her duties or functions as or incidental to being a participant in the Club
shall engage in conduct that discriminates, directly or indirectly against another person
on the basis of that person’s race, religion, colour, descent or national or ethnic origin.

3.4 Victimisation

3.4.1 No person in his/her capacity as a spectator or participant in the Club in the course of carrying out his/her duties or functions as or incidental to being a participant in the
Club shall victimise another person.
3.4.2 A person will victimise another person (the victim) if:
(a) the person subjects or threatens to subject the victim to any detriment because the victim (or a person associated with the victim) intends to or has lodged a complaint in contravention of this Policy; or
(b) the person assists, requests, induces, encourages or authorises another person to subject the victim to any detriment because the victim (or a person associated with the victim) intends to or has lodged a complaint in contravention of this Policy.

Section 4 Authorised Persons

4.1 The Club will appoint a Complaints Officer (the Club’s Complaints Officer) to ensure that any breach of this Policy is responded to in an equitable and prompt
manner.
4.2 The President of the Club (the President) is the senior decision-maker in the Club’s Complaints Process. Therefore, should the President be absent for a significant period, he/she must nominate a person to act on his/her behalf should the process need to be enacted.

Section 5 Confidentiality and Records

5.1 Confidentiality must be maintained throughout the complaints process. All parties to a complaint, the President (or Delegate), the Club’s Complaints Officer, any witnesses
and the Conciliator must all agree, in writing, to the maintenance of confidentiality. No person involved in the complaints process shall publicly comment on any aspect of the complaints process without the prior written agreement of all parties.
5.2 The Club shall ensure that any documents relating to a complaint shall remain confidential and be retained for 7 years from the date that the complaint is made.

Section 6 Inter club Breach of the Policy

In the event that it is alleged that a spectator or participant from another Club has contravened this Policy:
6.1 an Umpire, spectator or participant of the Club may by 5.00pm on the first working day following the day on which the contravention is alleged to have occurred, lodge a complaint in writing with the Complaint’s Officer of the Club;
6.2 the Complaint’s Officer of the Club where the complaint was made shall, by 5.00pm on the next working day following the day that the complaint was lodged with the Club,
lodge the complaint with the League’s Complaints Officer;
6.3 the Club’s Complaints Officer will take no further action once the complaint has been lodged with the League unless otherwise instructed by the League’s Complaints Officer.

Section 7 Intra Club Breach of the Policy

In the event that it is alleged that a participant of the Club has contravened this Policy an Umpire, spectator or participant may, by 5.00pm on the first working day following the day on which the contravention is alleged to have occurred, lodge a complaint in writing with the Club’s Complaints Officer.

Section 8 Management of Intra Club Complaints

The Club’s Complaints Officer shall:
8.1 make every effort to ensure that:
8.1.1 confidentiality is maintained at all times during the complaints process and that the outcome of the complaints process remains confidential;
8.1.2 any breach of confidentiality is referred to the Sydney Football League’s Tribunal no later than 5pm on the next working day following the day that the breach was discovered;
8.2 inform the person alleged to have contravened the Policy (the respondent) of the complaint and provide the respondent with an opportunity to respond to it;
8.3 inform only the President of the Club or Nominee, that a Complaint has been received by the Complaints Officer;
8.4 obtain written statements from any witnesses identified by both parties to the complaint;
8.5 where available, obtain any other evidence;
8.6 arrange for the complaint to be conciliated, by an independent conciliator agreed upon by both parties;
8.7 take all steps necessary for the complaint to be conciliated within 5 working days from the day on which the incident is alleged to have occurred;
8.8 refer the complaint to the League’s Tribunal:
8.8.1 when the complainant informs the Complaints Officer that the matter has not been resolved through conciliation. The Complaints Officer will if requested by the complainant, take all steps necessary for the complaint to be referred to League’s Tribunal within 5 working days from when the conciliation failed;
8.8.2 directly when a respondent has previously taken part in conciliation as a respondent of a complaint;
8.8.3 when both the Club’s Complaints Officer and President have determined that the complaint was lacking in substance and was made vexatiously;
8.8.4 when both the Club’s Complaints Officer and President determine that under Anti Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW) or the Discrimination Act 1991 (ACT) the complaint could be considered as “serious”, he/she will take all steps necessary for the complaint to be referred to the League’s Tribunal within 5 working days from the day on which the incident is alleged to have occurred;
8.9 ensure that any time limit referred to in this Policy may be extended by the Club if in the opinion of the President of the Club it is just and equitable to do so;
8.10 ensure that where a matter is resolved by conciliation the only public statement that shall be made shall be agreed to by both parties to the complaint and the Club’s President and that the terms of any settlement are finalised to the satisfaction of the complainant and respondent and signed by the parties and the conciliator.

Section 9 Club’s Liability

The Club may be vicariously liable for conduct engaged in by a participant which if found to have contravened this Policy, if the Club is unable to establish that it took reasonable precautions to prevent the participant from engaging in that conduct.

Section 10 Monitoring and Review of the Policy

The Policy will be monitored on an ongoing basis by the Club’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committee.

Section 11 Policy Commencement

This Policy was passed by Club’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Committee on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and will take effect from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .